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2013-2014 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda)
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering
   
 
    
 
  Dec 11, 2017
 
2013-2014 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Aerospace Engineering

  
  •  

    AE-UY 4603 Compressible Flow

    3 Credits
    This course covers conservation equations for inviscid flows, one-dimensional flows, normal shock waves, one-dimensional flow with friction, one-dimensional flow with heat addition, oblique shock waves and Prandtl- Meyer expansion waves.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3333  and ME-UY 3313 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    AE-UY 4613 Aerodynamics

    3 Credits
    The course explores incompressible inviscid flow, rotational and irrotational flow, elementary flows and their superposition, airfoil and wing geometry, aerodynamic forces and moments, thin airfoil theory, camber effects, incompressible laminar and turbulent boundary layer, vortex system, incompressible flow about wings, wing/body configurations, compressible flows past airfoils and wings and high-lift devices.

    Prerequisite(s): AE-UY 4603  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    AE-UY 4633 Aerospace Propulsion

    3 Credits
    This course looks at operation, performance and design methods for flight-vehicle propulsion, air-breathing engines, ramjets, turbojets, turbofans and their components, elements of solid and liquid rocket-propulsion systems.

    Prerequisite(s): AE-UY 4603  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    AE-UY 4653 Aircraft Flight Mechanics

    3 Credits
    The course examines development of equations of motion. Topics: Characteristics of aircraft-propulsion systems; Level flight performance of turbojet and propeller-driven aircraft; Unaccelerated climbing flight and aircraft ceiling; Takeoff and landing performance; Longitudinal and lateral static stability; Linearized equations of motion; Longitudinal and lateral modes of motion.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3223 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Art History

  
  •  

    AH-UY 2114 History of Art as Techné

    4 Credits
    This introduction to Western Art in different historical periods focuses on pre-20th-century art. The course samples important periods and themes in art history, from ancient Egypt and archaic Greece to the present. This course also enhances cultural, social and aesthetic understanding through intensive engagement with a variety of visual forms in different historical periods. In addition, the course focuses on technological and social developments that drive creative innovation.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    AH-UY 3214 Contemporary Art, Electronic Art and Technology

    4 Credits
    This audiovisual lecture course focuses on contemporary international art. Each week will feature a selected media element (film, video or audio) to illustrate the focus of the session, a required reading assignment and a discussion period.

    Prerequisite(s): AH-UY 2114 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    AH-UY 4911 Special Topics in Art History

    Variable Credits
    This advanced seminar explores a specific topic in historical or contemporary art history. Students are expected to participate actively through seminar presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous class discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): AH-UY 3214 AH-UY 3214 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    AH-UY 4912 Special Topics in Art History

    Variable Credits
    This advanced seminar explores a specific topic in historical or contemporary art history. Students are expected to participate actively through seminar presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous class discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): AH-UY 3214 AH-UY 3214 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    AH-UY 4913 Special Topics in Art History

    Variable Credits
    This advanced seminar explores a specific topic in historical or contemporary art history. Students are expected to participate actively through seminar presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous class discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): AH-UY 3214 AH-UY 3214 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.


Biomedicalengineering

Graduate Courses

Course descriptions of biomedical engineering courses, as well as CM and CBE courses associated with the MS in Biomedical Engineering Program, are given below. Other courses that are not described below are listed in the Biomedical Engineering Program and can be found in the course descriptions by their departments elsewhere in this catalog.

  
  •  

    BE-GY 871x Guided Studies in Biomedical Engineering


    Under faculty supervision, students study selections, analyses, solutions and presentations of biomedical engineering reports for problems in products, processes or equipment design, or other fields of biomedical-engineering practices. Conferences are scheduled. Master’s degree candidates are required to submit three unbound copies of their reports to advisers one week before the last day of classes. Credits: 6 total, each 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
  
  •  

    BE-GY 873x Research in Biomedical Engineering

    6 total, each 3 Credits
    Supervised by faculty, this course examines engineering fundamental or applied research in biomedical engineering. Conferences are scheduled. Master’s degree candidates are required to submit three unbound copies of their reports to advisers one week before the last day of classes.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
  
  •  

    BE-GY 997x MS Thesis in Biomedical Engineering

    9 total, each 3 Credits
    The thesis for the master’s degree in biomedical engineering should report the results of an original investigation of problems in biomedical engineering or application of physical, chemical or other scientific principles to biomedical engineering. The thesis may involve experimental research, theoretical analyses or process designs, or combinations of them. Master’s degree candidates are required to submit four unbound copies to advisers before the seventh Wednesday before commencement. Registration of at least 9 credits required

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
  
  •  

    BE-GY 999X PhD Thesis Research in Biomedical Engineering

    variable Credits
    Theses for the PhD degree must give results of independent investigations of problems in chemical engineering and may involve experimental or theoretical work. Theses must show ability to do creative work and must show that original contributions, worthy of publication in recognized journals, are made to chemical engineering. Candidates are required to take oral examinations on thesis subjects and related topics. Doctoral-degree candidates must submit five unbound thesis copies to advisers before or on the seventh Wednesday before commencement.

    Prerequisite(s): Passing grade in  Passing grade in  , and Adviser’s approval.
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6013 Molecular Immunology

    3 Credits
    The course familiarizes students with the body of research that underpins the understanding of the molecular basis and the cellular interactions that regulate immune responses. Topics: Antibody structure, B-cell development, T-cell structure and development, T-cell-MHC interaction, MHC structure and antigen processing, complement chemistry, complement and Fc receptor structure and function, transplantation immun-genetics, mucosal immunology and allergic reactions.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6023 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

    3 Credits
    A three-part, comprehensive overview of cellular neuroscience, this course covers the physiology and biophysics of neurons; neuronal signal transduction, gene expression  and transport of RNA and protein; and synaptic transmission and plasticity. The textbook is Fundamental Neuroscience by Zigmond, Bloom, Landis, Roberts and Squire. Supplementary readings are from other textbooks and journal articles.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6103 Anatomy, Physiology and Biophysics I

    3 Credits
    Anatomy and Physiology are the sciences that identify body structures and how they function and interact, respectively. Therefore, academic training for biomedical engineering must include a sound, comprehensive knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. While the course emphasizes normal functions, it also considers the consequences of disease and injury and deals with the body’s potential for recovery and compensation. The Biophysics’ component examines the underlying physical principles of organ function. Part I of this two-part sequence focuses on Cell Physiology and Homeostasis, Cardiac, Nervous, and Respiratory systems. The course will be taught using a “systems engineering” approach and introduce the design considerations for artificial organs. The material includes hands-on demonstration of technology to measure EEGs, EKG and respiratory function.

    Prerequisite(s): Calculus, biochemistry, introductory gross and cellular anatomy.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6113 Anatomy, Physiology and Biophysics II

    3 Credits
    Part II of this sequence focuses on the muscular, skeletal, renal and endocrine systems and includes discussions on skin and basic oncology. This part is taught using a same systems engineering and biophysics approach and link concepts from BE 6103. The material includes hands-on demonstration of technology to measure EMG and plasma glucose.

    Prerequisite(s): BE-GY 6103 BE-GY 6103 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6203 Biomedical Imaging I

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the physics, instrumentation and signal-processing methods used in X-ray imaging (projection radiography), X-ray computed tomography, nuclear medicine (SPECT/PET), ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate-level courses in multivariable calculus, physics, and probability. Corequisite(s): undergraduate or graduate level signals and systems. Open to graduate students and upper-level UG students. Signals and systems (EE-UY 3054  undergraduate or graduate level signals and systems. Open to graduate students and upper-level UG students. Signals and systems (EE-UY 3054 , preferred but not required).
    Also listed under: EL-GY 6813 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6213 Biomedical Imaging II

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the mechanisms and concepts related to image acquisition and subsequent image processing and image formation in biomedical imaging modalities. Building on material covered in Biomedical Imaging I, these courses focus on advanced topics such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, biomagnetic imaging and optical tomographic imaging (OTI).

    Prerequisite(s): BE-GY 6203  (Biomedical Imaging 1, B).
    Also listed under: EL-GY 6823 EL-GY 6823 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6223 Image Processing

    3 Credits
    The course covers image formation and perception; image acquisition, representation and display; image sampling and resizing; contrast enhancement; two-dimensional Fourier transform and other unitary transforms; frequency domain and spatial domain linear filtering; median and morphological filtering; image smoothing, sharpening and edge detection through linear and nonlinear filtering; color image representation and processing; lossless and lossy-image coding techniques and standards, image de-blurring; imaging geometry, image registration and geometric transformation. C- or MATLAB implementation of selected imaging-processing algorithms.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or EE-UY 3054 Graduate student status or EE-UY 3054  and MA-UY 3012 .
    Also listed under: EL-GY 5123 EL-GY 5123 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6303 Bio-optics

    3 Credits
    Recent growth in using optics technology for biomedical research and health care has been explosive. New applications are made possible by emerging technologies in lasers, optoelectronic devices, fiber optics, physical and chemical sensors and imaging—all of which are now applied to medical research, diagnostics and therapy. This sequence course on optics for biomedical students combines fundamental knowledge of the generation and interaction of electromagnetic waves with applications to the biomedical field. The goal is for this approach is to provide tools for researchers in bio-physics and to familiarize researchers, technologists and premed students with cutting-edge approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): An undergraduate course in physics that includes electricity, magnetism and waves such as PH-UY 2023  and an undergraduate course in physics that includes electricity, magnetism and waves such as PH-UY 2023  and multivariable calculus such as MA-UY 2122  and MA-UY 2122 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6403 Digital Signal Processing I

    3 Credits
    Discrete and continuous-time linear systems. Z-transform. Fourier transforms. Sampling. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Fast Fourier transform (FFT). Digital filtering. Design of FIR and IIR filters. Windowing. Least squares in signal processing. Minimum-phase and all-pass systems. Digital filter realizations. Matlab programming exercises.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.
    Also listed under: EL-GY 6113 EL-GY 6113 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6453 Probability and Stochastic Processes

    3 Credits
    Continuous and discrete random variables and their joint probability distribution and density functions; Functions of one random variable and their distributions;  Independent random variables and conditional distributions;  One function of one and two random variables; Two functions of two random  variables and their joint density functions; Jointly distributed discrete random variables and their functions; Characteristic functions and higher order moments; Covariance, correlation, orthogonality;  Jointly Gaussian random variables; Linear functions of Gaussian random variables and their joint density functions. Stochastic processes and the concept of Stationarity; Strict sense stationary (SSS) and wide sense stationary (WSS) processes; Auto correlation function and its properties; Poisson processes and Wiener processes;  Stochastic inputs to linear time-invariant (LTI)  systems and their input-output autocorrelations;   Input-output power spectrum for linear systems with stochastic inputs; Minimum mean square error estimation (MMSE) and orthogonality principle; Auto regressive moving average (ARMA) processes and their power spectra.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status
    Also listed under: EL-GY 6303 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6463 Statistics for Biomedical Engineers

    3 Credits
    This course reviews various methods of analysis for biomedical data. Contents: population and sample, confidence interval, hypothesis test, Bayesian logic, correlation, regression, design of studies, t test, chi-square test, analysis of variance, multiple regression, survival curves. Multivariable Calculus knowledge required; Probability Theory knowledge is preferred.

  
  •  

    BE-GY 6483 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory

    3 Credits
    This course includes hands-on laboratory experiments, lectures and projects relating to real-time, digital signal processing (DSP)systems using a DSP microprocessor. Students gain experience in implementing common algorithms used in a variety of applications and learn tools and functions important for designing DSP-based systems. Students are required to complete a project and give an oral presentation. This course is suitable for students interested in DSP and Embedded Systems.

    Prerequisite(s): EL-GY 6113  or Equivalent, C/C++.
    Also listed under: EL-GY 6183 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6503 Biomedical Instrumentation

    3 Credits
    This course, is for graduate students in the Bioengineering Program, introduces the principles of commonly used instruments in neuroscience research, particularly in electrophysiology and imaging. The course discusses theoretical considerations in choosing techniques as well as practical issues in selecting materials and designing experiments.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6601 Introduction to Drug Delivery

    1.5 Credits
    This course introduces drug-delivery science focusing on the historical development of delivery methods, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug-delivery systems, routes of administration, devices for drug delivery and, briefly, on various targeting methods and delivery of gene- and protein based therapeutics.

    Prerequisite(s): BTE-GY 6013 BTE-GY 6013  or adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6603 Drug Delivery

    3 Credits
    The course provides an integrated approach to the basic and clinical science of drug delivery. Topics: the history drug delivery; kinds of drugs to be delivered, including genes and proteins; various targeting mechanisms; transport phenomena and thermodynamic concepts; pharmacokinetics of drug delivery, polymeric drug-delivery systems; various devices developed for controlled delivery.

    Prerequisite(s): calculus with ordinary diff. eq.; undergraduate courses in biology, chemistry and physiology (minimum grade B).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6653 Principles of Chemical and Biochemical Systems

    3 Credits
    This is an introductory course that is referred to graduate students who have not had any undergraduate chemistry courses. It focuses on fundamental knowledge of chemical and biochemical reactions. Students learn structure and function of biological molecules such as proteins, carbohydrates and DNA. They master basic concepts of structure-property relationships of macromolecules. Chemistries critical to biosensor technologies such as linking biological molecules to various supports, is described. Students appreciate and understand the wide range of chemical and biological molecules critical to living systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6703 Materials in Medicine

    3 Credits
    The course focuses on the basic principles behind human-tissue response to artificial surfaces and materials; the general types of polymeric and metallic materials used in soft- and hard-tissue replacements; tissue engineering and drug-delivery devices; current approaches directed toward the engineering of cell-based replacement for various tissues; techniques to control the physiologic response to artificial surfaces; critical review of current biomaterials literature; current research in the field; evaluation of the design criteria that a material must meet for a biological application; and what is required for “biocompatibility.”

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6723 Natural Polymers and Materials

    3 Credits
    This course introduces natural and biomimetic polymers with an interdisciplinary view of biology, chemistry and macromolecular science. Topics: Natural building blocks and methods by which nature carries out polymer synthesis and modification reactions; DNA; structural proteins; plant proteins; polysaccharides; polyesters; biosurfactants; polymers built from natural monomers and a wide variety of renewable resources; uses of polymers as fibers, films, rheological modifiers, flocculants, foams, adhesives and membranes; special applications of natural polymers in medicine and as biodegradable plastics.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 6753 Orthopaedic Biomechanics and Biomaterials

    3 Credits
    The course provides fundamental knowledge of the relevant background science, theory, practice and materials required to provide modern orthopedic and trauma care. Students learn about biomaterials used in orthopedics and how materials engineering has made them increasingly sophisticated. The course covers important clinical applications as well as fundamental concepts in biomechanics of bone and other tissues; materials used; wear and corrosion during use; dental implants; joint-replacement devices; stress-strain analysis, beam theory; introduction to finite element analysis design for prosthesis; and more.

    Prerequisite(s): Calculus with ordinary diff. eq. and BE-GY 6703 Calculus with ordinary diff. eq. and BE-GY 6703 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 9433 Protein Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the modern protein engineering techniques that allow researchers to understand protein structure and function and to create new proteins for many purposes. This new field is at the interface of chemistry, biology and engineering. The first part of the course discusses the protein composition and structure, various genetic, biochemical and chemical techniques required to engineer proteins, which is followed by specific topics. Topics include designing proteins that are highly structured; that are active at high temperatures and in non-aqueous solvents; that interact selectively with other proteins, small molecules and nucleic acids for therapeutic purposes; and that catalyze new reactions.

    Prerequisite(s): CM-GY 9413 CM-GY 9413  or adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 9443 Tissue Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course teaches basic biological processes that occur during blood contact with artificial surfaces; how to critically read and review literature on tissue engineering; how to anticipate biocompatibility issues with a variety of implant devices students may later encounter; current approaches directed toward the engineering of cell-based replacements for various tissue types.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BE-GY 9730 Colloquium in Biomedical Engineering

    0 Credits
    Engineers and scientists from industry and academia present recent developments in biomedical engineering. Two and four semesters are required for master’s and PhD students, respectively.

    Prerequisite(s): None.
  
  •  

    BE-GY 9740 Seminar in Biomedical Engineering


    Students present research findings if engaged in MS or PhD thesis research, or make presentations from their critical analysis of recent biomedical-engineering publications. The seminar gives students the opportunity to prepare a scientific presentation on a biomedical-engineering topic of interest and to speak before their peers, who will question them.

  
  •  

    BE-GY 9753 Bioethics Seminar

    3 Credits
    This graduate-level seminar course discusses the ethical issues relevant to today’s bioengineers and molecular and cell biologists. Topics include: Darwin’s theory of evolution; science and religion in twentieth-century America; Intelligent Design Theory; social Darwinism and the concomitant rise of eugenics in Europe and the U.S., the ways in which molecular genetics has challenged historical categories of race; the ethical, social, and legal implications of the Human Genome Project (specifically genetic privacy and testing, human genes and intellectual property); argo-biotechnology and the science, ethics, and politics of genetically modified organisms (GMOs); and the science, politics, and ethics of human-embryonic-stem-cell research. The student is encouraged to think about the way in which debates concerning “nature versus nurture” have been framed historically, in order to understand current controversies over that distinction.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Bioinformatics

  
  •  

    BI-GY 997X MS Thesis in Bioinformatics


    (As arranged) The course emphasizes original research, which serves as the basis for a master’ s degree. Theminimum research registration requirement for the master’ s thesis is 9 credits. Registration for research is required each semester consecutively until students have completed adequate research projects and an acceptable thesis, and have passed required oral examinations. Research credits registered for each semesterrealistically reflect time devoted to research.

    Prerequisite(s): For MS candidates; Degree status, consent of graduate adviser and thesis director.
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7513 Chemical Foundation for Bioinformatics

    3 Credits
    This course intensively reviews those aspects of organic chemistry and biochemistry necessary to begin research in bioinformatics and to enter graduate courses in biology. Topics include covalent bonding, quantum mechanical basis of bond formation, three- dimensional structure of molecules, reaction mechanisms, catalysis, polymers, enzymes, thermodynamic and kinetic foundations, metabolic pathways, sequence and structure of macromolecules. This course extensively uses computer approaches to convey the essential computational and visual nature of material to be covered.

    Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry, General Physics, Organic Chemistry and Calculus.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7523 Biological Foundation for Bioinformatics

    3 Credits
    This course intensively reviews the aspects of biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology necessary to begin research in bioinformatics and to enter graduate courses in biology. The areas covered include cell structure, intracellular sorting, cellular signaling (i.e., receptors), Cytoskelton, cell cycle, DNA replication, transcription and translation. This course extensively uses computer approaches to convey the essential computational and visual nature of the material to be covered.

    Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry, General Physics, Organic Chemistry, Calculus or permission of instructor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7533 Bioinformatics I: Sequence Analysis

    3 Credits
    This course covers computer representations of nucleic acid and protein sequences; pair-wise and multiple alignment methods; available databases of nucleic acid and protein sequences; database search methods; scoring functions for assessment of alignments; nucleic acid to protein sequence translation and codon usage; genomic organization and gene structure in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; introns and exons; prediction of open reading frames; alternative splicing; existing databases of mRNA, DNA protein and genomic information; and an overview of available pro- grams and of Web resources.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7543 Bioinformatics II: Protein Structure

    3 Credits
    The course explores protein-folding representations; databases of protein-folding classes; secondary structure prediction; tertiary structure prediction via computer-folding experiments threading; homology model building; prediction of post translation modification sites; active and binding sites in proteins; representations of contiguous and non-contiguous epitopes on protein surfaces at the sequence level; representations of functional motifs at the three dimensional and at the sequence level.

    Prerequisite(s): BI-GY 7533 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7553 Bioinformatics III: Functional Prediction

    3 Credits
    The course covers functional classifications of proteins; prediction of function from sequence and structure; Orthologs and Paralogs; rep- resentations of biological pathways; available systems for the analysis of whole genomes and for human-assisted and automatic functional prediction.

    Prerequisite(s): BI-GY 7543 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7563 Chemoinformatics

    3 Credits
    This course features a review of database theory; chemical structure representation; connection tables, line notations and structure diagrams;   representations of chemical reactions; structure manipulation: graph theory, structure analysis: ring perception, structural fingerprints, symmetry perception,  molecular modeling algorithms, genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, QSAR historical approaches, structural search of chemical databases, commercial  chemical information databases, combinatorial chemistry and diversity  assessment.

  
  •  

    BI-GY 7573 Special Topics in Informatics in Chemical and Biological Sciences


    This course covers special topics on various advanced or specialized topics in chemo- or bioinformatics that are presented at intervals.

  
  •  

    BI-GY 7583 Guided Studies in Bioinformatics I

    3 Credits
    This research/case course can be handled in different ways at the faculty adviser’ s discretion. The course may involve a series of cases that are dissected and analyzed, or it may involve teaming students with industry personnel for proprietary or non-proprietary research projects. Generally, the student works under faculty supervision, but the course is intended to be largely self-directed within the guidelines established by the supervising faculty member. Master’ s degree candidates must submit an unbound copy of their report to adviser/s one week before the last day of classes. Credits: 6 total, each 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7593 Guided Studies in Bioinformatics II

    3 Credits
    This research/case course can be handled in different ways at the faculty adviser’ s discretion. The course may involve a series of cases that are dissected and analyzed, or it may involve teaming students with industry personnel for proprietary or non-proprietary research projects. Generally, the student works under faculty supervision, but the course is intended to be largely self-directed within the guidelines established by the supervising faculty member. Master’ s degree candidates must submit an unbound copy of their report to adviser/s one week before the last day of classes. Credits: 6 total, each 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7613 Introduction to Systems Biology

    3 Credits
    This course explains the functioning of basic circuit elements in transcription regulation, signal transduction and developmental networks of living cells, using simplified mathematical models. The course focuses on design principles and information processing in biological circuits. It discusses network motifs, modularity, robustness, evolutional optimization and error minimization by kinetic proofreading in specific applications to bacterial chemotaxis, developmental patterning, neuronal circuits and immune recognition in several well-studied biological systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BI-GY 7543 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7623 Systems Biology: -Omes and –Omics

    3 Credits
    This course summarizes knowledge in genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and relative molecular technologies. Topics include an overview of technologies in functional genomics (DNA chip arrays); whole genome expression analysis (EST, MPSS, SAGE, arrays); proteome analysis technology (2D-electrophoresis, protein in situ digestion for mass spectrometric analysis, yeast 2-hybrid analysis. 2-D PAGE, MALDI-TOF spectroscopy); the principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry technologies for metabolomics, including general principles, the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, the requirements for sample preparation and the options for the management of output data. This course explains how to exploit different -ome database resources for investigations via special practical tasks to lectures. Special attention is focused on nutrigenomics, a multidisciplinary science that uses genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics to study metabolic health. This relatively new area of metabolomics has the potential to contribute significantly to advances in nutrition and health.

    Prerequisite(s): BI-GY 7543  and BI-GY 7553 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7633 Microarray Analysis

    3 Credits
    This course will train students how to analyze DNA microarrays experiments. In first part of the course, students will gain practical experience using R (Bio Conductor pack- ages) in pre processing microarray data, normalization and summarizing expression data, putting data together for filtering, differential expression, clustering annotations to identify differentially expressed genes and relevant pathways. The second part of the course focuses on labs from Bio Conductor work- shops, review of computational approaches for studying gene expression data. Data mining techniques such as linear modeling for time course data analysis, learning algorithms like support vector machines for classification problems and meta-analysis across experiments are introduced.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7643 Methods in Genome Computing

    3 Credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to the Perl programming language, its bioinformatics toolbox BioPerl and Unix commands for processing high throughput genomic and/or proteomic data. The first part of the course deals with the fundamentals of Perl. The second part deals with sub- routines, object oriented Perl, and using BioPerl modules to perform sequence analysis and graphics rendering. Students also learn how to use BioPerl modules to set up an analysis pipeline.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7653 Next Generation Sequence Analysis

    3 Credits
    Next Generation Sequencing course teaches our students how to analyze massive amounts of data from genome sequencing machines in order to meet the growing demand for healthcare solutions.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    BI-GY 7843 Molecular Modeling and Simulation

    3 Credits
    This course introduces principles and applications of modern molecular modeling and simulations methods, using commercial software packages on powerful computer workstations. Algorithms for visualizing and predicting structural and physical properties of molecules and molecular aggregates are taught, based on principles of quantum, classical and statistical mechanics, which are in a mathematically simplified form. Commercial software packages are applied to illustrative problems in physical chemistry, chemical engineering, biology and medicine.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of core undergraduate courses in mathematics and science (grade C or better) in CE, CM, CS, EE, ME or PH, or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

GSAS Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL-GA 2030 Statistics in Biology

    4 Credits
    Advanced course on techniques of statistical analysis and experimental design that are useful in research and in the interpretation of biology literature. Principles of statistical inference, the design of experiments, and analysis of data are taught using examples drawn from the literature. Covers the use of common parametric and nonparametric distributions for the description of data and the testing of hypotheses.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BIOL-GA 2303 Introduction to Biostatistics

    4 Credits
    Introduction to probability and statistical methods utilized in the analysis and interpretation of experimental and epidemiological data. Statistical techniques associated with the normal, binomial, Poisson, t, F, and chi squared distributions plus an introduction to nonparametric methods. Applications in biology, medicine, and the health sciences.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Biomolecular Science

  
  •  

    BMS-GY 8011 Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory

    1.5 Credits
    The course covers the fundamentals of biology. Topics: Physical, chemical and biochemical bases of life on various organizational levels, cellular morphology, complementarily of form and function, including reproduction, development and genetics.

    Corequisite(s): BMS-GY 8013 . This course is not open to students who have taken BMS-UY 4324 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-GY 8013 Advanced Molecular Biology

    3 Credits
    Understanding the complex and dynamic interactions of cellular function. Topics include classical molecular biology (DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis), recombinant DNA and genetic engineering, interactions of macromolecules and regulation of biologic systems. This course is not open to students who have taken BMS-UY 4324 .

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-GY 8021 Advanced Cell Biology Laboratory

    1.5 Credits
    Provides students with practical experience in some key cell and molecular biology techniques, including analysis of different cell types, cell differentiation, PCR, transformations and selection of cell lines with particular features. The course covers proper data handling and reporting techniques. This course is not open to students who have taken BMS-UY 3314 .

    Corequisite(s): BMS-GY 8023 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-GY 8023 Advanced Cell Biology

    3 Credits
    Understanding cell biology through the biochemistry of the cell, with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell and its organelles. Advanced theories of cytoskeletal proteins, cell junctions and matrix, protein signaling and cell death will be covered. This course is not open to students who have taken BMS-UY 3314 .

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 471X Guided Studies in Biomolecular Science


    As arranged Special project (experimental, theoretical, computational or literature search). Maximum 6 credits (including the credits of CM-UY 471X) count toward the degree requirements.

  
  •  

    BMS-UY 1004 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

    4 Credits
    The course covers the fundamentals of biology. Topics: Physical, chemical and biochemical bases of life on various organizational levels, cellular morphology, complementarily of form and function, including reproduction, development and genetics.

    Corequisite(s):  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 2004 Introduction to Physiology

    4 Credits
    This course continues biology fundamentals. Topics: Emphasis on evolutionary theory, phylogeny and comparative physiology including homeostasis, regulation, integration and coordination of organisms at the systems level.

    Prerequisite(s): BMS-UY 1004  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 2512 Biostatistics

    2 Credits
    The course introduces statistical methods used in biology, including probability, statistical distributions, regression, correlation and tests.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 3114 Genetics

    4 Credits
    The course covers the genetics of bacteria,viruses and high organisms. Emphasis is on both the genetic and biochemical analyses of gene replication, heredity, mutation, recombination and gene expression. Included are comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics and regulation. Laboratory techniques are used to study genetic phenomena in prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. The course emphasizes modern approaches to genetic research.

    Prerequisite(s): BMS-UY 1004 . Corequisite(s): CM-UY 2213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 3214 Microbiology

    4 Credits
    The course studies microbial organisms, especially bacteria and viruses. Topics: Microbial relationship to disease, infections and immunological processes. Mutation, transformation, transduction, induction and bioenergetic processes. Laboratory work includes experimental analysis of microbial structure and physiology by biochemical and cytochemical means. Also studied: Influence of environment on nutrition, enzymes and metabolism of representative microbial species. Lab fee required.

    Prerequisite(s): BMS-UY 2004  and CM-UY 1014  or CM-UY 1004  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 3314 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology I

    4 Credits
    This first semester of a year-long course explores the molecular basis of cell function and current trends in molecular biology. The lab component is a year-long project to locate, characterize, clone and express a gene. A Lab fee is required.

    Prerequisite(s): CM-UY 3314  and CM-UY 2223  (see BMS-UY 4324  for second semester).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4011 Senior Seminar

    1 Credits
    In this course, students present seminars based on current literature.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4314 Advanced Cell Physiology

    4 Credits
    The course analyzes chemical and physical mechanisms of cellular function. Topics: Molecular constituents of biological systems, enzymes and reaction rates, energetic and regulation of metabolic processes, membrane transport, contractility and irritability. Laboratory studies examine cellular components in terms of their functional activities (enzymes, oxidative-phosphorylation, photosynthesis), kinetics of soluble and membrane-bound enzymes and membrane transport. A

    Prerequisite(s): BMS-UY 2004  and CM-UY 2614 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4324 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology II

    4 Credits
    This is the second semester of a year-long course that examines the molecular basis of cell function and current trends in molecular biology. The lab component is a year-long project to locate, characterize, clone and express a gene.

    Prerequisite(s): BMS-UY 3314 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4414 Biophysics

    4 Credits
    This course explores the molecular basis of complex biochemical functions, membrane transport, intercellular and extracellular signaling, metabolism and energy transduction, DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and control, macromolecular assemblies and special topics in biochemistry.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4814 Topics in Biology

    4 Credits
    Advanced or specialized topics in biology. As arranged.

  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4824 Topics in Biology

    4 Credits
    Advanced or specialized topics in biology. As arranged.

  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4834 Topics in Biology

    4 Credits
    Advanced or specialized topics in biology. As arranged.

  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4844 Topics in Biology

    4 Credits
    Advanced or specialized topics in biology. As arranged.

  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4914 Undergraduate Research in Biomolecular Science

    4 Credits
    The course investigates problems in biomolecular science under faculty supervision. Library research, experimental studies and a written BS Thesis are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status or adviser’s approval, CM-UY 4011  and CM-GY 5040 .
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4924 Undergraduate Research in Biomolecular Science

    4 Credits
    The course investigates problems in biomolecular science under faculty supervision. Library research, experimental studies and a written BS Thesis are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status or adviser’s approval, CM-UY 4011  and CM-GY 5040 .
  
  •  

    BMS-UY 4934 Life Science Internship

    4 Credits
    The internship comprises supervised projects in hospital, community or industrial settings. Students are evaluated on the basis of written and oral reports presented to faculty and outside project Co-sponsors. Faculty conferences and visits are required. Internships are open to senior students with approval of the departmental adviser. Planned experiences significantly expose students to relationships between theoretical information and practical applications.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status or adviser’s approval.

Biotechnology

  
  •  

    BE-GY 6253 Biosensors

    3 Credits


    This course discusses various biosensors, which consist of bio-recognition systems, typically enzymes or binding proteins such as antibodies immobilized onto the surface of physico-chemical transducers. Immuno-sensors, which use antibodies as their biorecognition system, are also discussed. Other bio-recognition systems covered are nucleic acids, bacteria and whole tissues of higher organisms. Specific interactions between the target analyte and the complementary bio-recognition layer that undergoes a physicochemical change are ultimately detected and measured by the transducer. Various transducers, that can take many forms depending upon the parameters measured (electrochemical, optical, mass and thermal changes) are also covered.

    Prerequisite(s):   ,  , and  

     

  
  •  

    BT-GY 6013 Biotechnology and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    3 Credits
    The course offers an in-depth look at the modern process of drug development, from the early stage of target identification and generation of lead compounds to regulatory approval, and the role of biotechnology in this complex process. All the key aspects, including preclinical development, clinical trials and regulatory requirements, are covered with considerable contributions from pharmaceutical professionals. Real-life case studies are presented to illustrate critical points in the development process. Major classes of biotech drugs are briefly discussed. Many course lectures are delivered by scientists from the major U.S. pharmaceutical companies.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6023 Biotechnology and Health Care

    3 Credits
    Biotechnology’s contribution to modern health care stretches far beyond developing new therapeutic entities. This course provides an overview of key cutting-edge technologies such as stem-cell research and therapeutic cloning and demonstrates how their applications change “the conventional” in terms of availability of new treatments, monitoring services and diagnostics. The course also examines the implications of Human Genome Project for health care and the role of genetics and epigenetic modifications of genes in health and disease. The role of biotechnology in managing a number of sociologically high-impact diseases in developed and developing countries is highlighted.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6033 Biosensors and Biochips

    3 Credits
    Biosensors and biochips is one of the most exciting, complex and fast-growing areas of biotechnology today—the interface between biotechnology, nanotechnology and micro-electronics industries. The course covers both conventional biosensors based on whole cells, nucleic acids, antibodies and enzymes (e.g., enzymatic glucose monitoring) as well as new and emerging technologies related to designing, fabricating and applying multi-array biochips and micro-fluidic systems (lab-on-the-chip). The goal is to familiarize students with basic principles of biosensors design and applications. The course also covers practical applications of this technology in health care, medical diagnostics, defense and other areas.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6043 Biocatalysis in Industry

    3 Credits
    The course focuses on the commercial use of biological catalysts across various industry segments, including pharmaceuticals, health care, fine chemicals and food. The course combines a broad overview of technologies with industrial insights into the economics of bio-processing. The course also covers emerging biomaterials trends. Case studies are presented to facilitate analysis, formulate trends and underline major challenges.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6053 Introduction to Neuroscience for Biotechnologists

    3 Credits
    The understanding of brain function represents a unique challenge by virtue of the tremendous complexity of neural circuits and their role in controlling behavior. This course is designed to provide graduate students with a comprehensive introduction to the basic mechanisms of brain function. It covers the basic mechanisms of neuronal excitability, how neuronal function is connected to cellular structures, how neurons act as elements of networks and how malfunctions lead to mental and neurological disorders. The goal is to provide graduate students a foundation of knowledge which will guide them in their decision to enter and navigate the vast field of neurobiology.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor/Instructor Permission Required
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6063 Immunology: Concepts, Mechanisms and Applications in Biotechnology

    3 Credits
    The purpose of this course is to develop a general understanding of the established biochemical, molecular, cellular, and organ-level principles that govern the workings of the mammalian immune system, and to prepare the student for immunological research in the academic, government, or industrial laboratory. Topics covered include cells of the immune system and their development, pattern recognition receptors and innate immunity, molecular mechanisms of antigen processing and presentation, long distance communication and immune cells’ migration, homing, and trafficking. Applications in Biotechnology and autoimmune diseases and the use of immunotherapy in industry will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor/Instructor Permission Required
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6073 Genetic Engineering

    3 Credits
    Genetic engineering underpins practically every aspect of modern biotechnology. This course aims at familiarizing students with the current methods of DNA manipulation and practical applications of recombinant DNA technology, including the use of vectors, construction of libraries, PCR, restriction digests, mapping, and cloning. The class includes lectures as well as a semester-long 3h/week lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor/Instructor Permission Required
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6083 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology

    3 Credits
    The course aims to advance students’ knowledge in key areas of cell and molecular biology. Topics covered included cell-cell communications, organization of the cytoskeleton, mechanisms of cell signaling and signal transduction, chromatin organization and structure and genome regulation, maintenance and repair. The lab component of the class is designed to provide students with advanced bench-top skills used in modern cell and molecular biology experimentation.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor/Instructor Permission Required
  
  •  

    BT-GY 6093 Biomedical Materials & Devices for Human Body Repair

    3 Credits
    The main objective of this multidisciplinary course is to provide students with a broad survey of currently used biomaterials and their use in medical devices for reconstructing or replacing injured, diseased, or aged human tissues and organs. Topics include a broad introduction to the materials used in medicine and their chemical, physical, and biological properties, basic mechanisms of wound healing and materials-tissue interactions.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor/Instructor Permission Required
  
  •  

    BT-GY 7011 Special Topics in Biotechnology

    1.5 Credits
    Special Topics include courses covering particular subject/technology to help students to gain more knowledge in an area they may want to specialize in after graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 7013 Special Topics in Biotechnology

    3 Credits
    Special topics include courses, designed to aid students in gaining extra knowledge/ specialization in a subject area of their choice.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 7033 Business Concepts for the Biotechnology Entrepreneur

    3 Credits
    Commonly Biotech discoveries are made in the lab, but their conversion to commercially viable products and services requires considerable knowledge and skills that many science and engineering graduates do not possess. This course focuses on the prospective entrepreneur with interest in biotechnology/biomedical products with emphasis placed on starting and sustaining a successful life science enterprise.

    Prerequisite(s): Any two required BT-GY courses or Advisor’s Permission.
  
  •  

    BT-GY 8713 Guided Studies in Biotechnology I

    3 Credits
    Special project (experimental, theoretical, computational, or literature search). Only one guided study course allowed per semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 8723 Guided Studies in Biotechnology II

    3 Credits
    Special project (experimental, theoretical, computational, or literature search). Only one guided study course allowed per semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 9053 Enzyme Catalysis in Organic Synthesis

    3 Credits
    The course provides a working knowledge of how to use biotransformations as a tool in organic chemistry. Students learn about general enzymatic reaction types that carry out the cleavage and formation of C-O bonds, P-O bonds, C-N bonds, C-C bonds, reduction reactions, oxidation reactions and isomerizations. Students also are taught advanced principles that apply to catalytic-protein engineering.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 9433 Protein Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course introduces modern protein engineering techniques available to researchers to understand protein structure and function and to create entirely new proteins for many purposes. This new field lies at the interface of chemistry, biology and engineering. The first section discusses protein composition and structure, and various genetic, biochemical and chemical techniques required to engineer proteins, followed by specific topics. Topics include designing highly structured proteins that are active at high temperatures and in non-aqueous solvents; that interact selectively with other proteins, small molecules and nucleic acids for therapeutic purposes; and that catalyze new reactions.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BT-GY 9443 Tissue Engineering

    3 Credits
    This courses covers basic biological processes that occur during blood contact with artificial surfaces; how to critically read and review literature about tissue engineering; how to anticipate bio-compatibility issues relevant to a variety of implant devices students may later encounter; and current approaches directed toward the engineering of cell-based replacements for various tissue types.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Biotechnology and Entreneurship

  
  •  

    BTE-GY 6013 Biotechnology and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    3 Credits
    The course looks at the modern process of drug development in depth—from the early stage of target identification and generation of lead compounds to regulatory approval, and the role of biotechnology in this complex process. The course, featuring significant participation by industry professionals, covers all key aspects, including preclinical development, clinical trials and regulatory requirements. Real-life case studies illustrate critical points in the development process. Major classes of biotech drugs are briefly discussed. Many lectures are delivered by scientists from major U.S. pharmaceutical companies.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BTE-GY 6023 Biotechnology and Health Care

    3 Credits
    The contribution of biotechnology to modern health care stretches far beyond developing therapeutic entities. This course provides an overview of key cutting-edge technologies such as stem-cell research and therapeutic cloning and demonstrates how their applications change “the conventional” for the availability of new treatments, monitoring services and diagnostics. The course also examines the implications of Human Genome Projects for health care and the role of genetics and epigenetic modifications of genes in health and disease. The role of biotechnology in managing several sociologically high-impact diseases in developed and developing countries is highlighted.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BTE-GY 6033 Biosensors and Biochips

    3 Credits
    Biosensors and biochips are two of the most exciting, complex and fast-growing areas of biotechnology today—the interface between biotechnology, nanotechnology and microelectronics industries. The course covers conventional biosensors based on whole cells, nucleic acids, antibodies and enzymes (e.g. enzymatic glucose monitoring) as well as new and emerging technologies related to designing, fabricating and applying multi-array biochips and micro-fluidic systems (lab-on-the-chip). The goal is to familiarize students with basic principles of biosensors design and applications. The course also covers practical applications of this technology in health care, medical diagnostics, defense and other areas.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BTE-GY 6043 Biocatalysis in Industry

    3 Credits
    Biosensors and biochips is one of the most exciting, complex and fast-growing areas of biotechnology today—the interface between biotechnology, nanotechnology and microelectronics industries. The course covers conventional biosensors based on whole cells, nucleic acids, antibodies and enzymes (e.g. enzymatic glucose monitoring) as well as new and emerging technologies related to designing, fabricating and applying multiarray biochips and micro-fluidic systems (lab-on-the-chip). The goal is to familiarize students with basic principles of biosensors design and applications. The course also covers practical applications of this technology in health care, medical diagnostics, defense and other areas.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    BTE-GY 9503 Project in Biotechnology and Entrepreneurship

    3 Credits
    This practical course offers students the opportunity to apply practically their knowledge and skills to analyzing technology, preparing their own business plans or working at an early stage biotech company. The student can sign up for up to three projects (one per semester).

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

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